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Mary Corbet

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I learned to embroider when I was a kid, when everyone was really into cross stitch (remember the '80s?). Eventually, I migrated to surface embroidery, teaching myself with whatever I could get my hands on...read more

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Hand Embroidery Patterns: Christie Designs for Stitch Practice

 

Here’s a little collection of simple hand embroidery designs from Grace Christie’s book, Samplers and Stitches, which you can find online for free. Now, you may be wondering why I would bother putting together a collection of images that come out of a free online book. There are a couple reasons…

Designs for Stitch Practice

The first reason is that the designs in Christie’s book Samplers and Stitches are actually shown with the stitch in progress on the design, so you can’t really see the lines of the whole little motif. The second reason is that, even if you didn’t mind the stitch-in-progress part and wanted to trace the little design, and you printed it, you would find that, for the stitch recommended in the book, the design as printed would be too large.

I’ve cleaned up several of the little designs and put them all together on one PDF, and if you print it, you will find that the little motifs are sized a bit better for the recommended stitch. I’ve also written the name of the stitch next to the design, so you can go back to the book and see her description of how to work the stitch. You can also find several of the stitches in my list of How-To Videos.

You’re certainly not restricted to the stitches she suggests – you can use the little designs to practice any stitches suitable for them! I’ve been adding a few of these to my spot sampler, using the stitches that Christie recommends along with a few of my own interpretations.

Finally, here’s the PDF:

Hand Embroidery Patterns: Christie Designs for Stitch Practice (PDF)

Enjoy!

 
 

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(11) Comments

    1. Hi, Pam – I think it depends on the design, more than anything else, as well as what you want the piece to look like. Some designs (like that scrolly thing in this set) are suited to line stitches, some are suited to filling. Some are suited to certain types of filling – or at least, more suited than others. For example, the thing that has “basket stitch” under it could be worked in satin stitch, but the texture of a basketweave stitch will look better on that, I think. The leaf designs could all be worked in satin stitch, but for different looking leaves, there are certainly plenty of other stitches that can be used, like the fishbone stitch, the fly stitch, and so forth. If you’re looking for a very “dressy” or “polished” look, then satin stitch is great for that. But if you want something that’s shaded, you have to choose a stitch that lends itself to color changes. If you want to fill a design and have it look textured or more rustic, then satin stitch might not be your best choice. So there are lots of possibilities, but you have to take into consideration the design and also what you want the finished product to look like.

  1. Thank you Mary, I have just had an idea from one of the drawings for something I need to do; I will send details & a picture later.

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  2. Thankyou very much for the design sheet Mary. I had given a trial of the stitches mentioned there on. Shall i post it on my blog?
    viji

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  3. Oh, thanks so much for doing this, Mary. I have the book and I’ve been meaning to work something from it for ages. Now I’m set to go!

    I expect you know Gail Marsh has another book out, EArly 20th Century Embroidery. Fascinating to see how the foremost embroiderers of the period all interlinked with each other, and learn more about their work and their place in history, including Grace Christie. It arrived a couple of days ago and I can’t leave it alone!

    Bless you.

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