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Outline stitching

I think I am currently having a brain farct. I saw the question regarding outline stitching viewtopic.php?f=2&t=102#p555 which goes along a little bit with my question, which is: In doing satin stitch, if I outline my object first then do the satin stitch over it, do I also outline my object in stem stitch when I have completed the satin stitching? For some reason, I cannot get this straight in my head. I'm thinking that if I outline in stem stitch (maybe using only 1 or 2 threads,) complete the satin stitching, and then outlining the satin stitch in stem stitch with perhaps either 2 or 3 threads. My pattern calls for outline after stitching, but I like stitching first in order to help keep the stitching uniform. I'm now second-guessing myself regarding whether or not I should outline the satin stitching after I complete it. Is this entirely too much stitching?
Mollysatin
Joined: 9/9/2011 2:32 pm
Posts: 4

Re: Outline stitching

Hi, Molly - It depends on the look you want, really. Mostly, satin stitch is not outlined after stitching, but in some designs, it might be, so it really depends on the design.

The split stitch outline that's worked along the design line before satin stitching is done so that it lifts the edge of the satin stitch up a bit and helps make very neat edges. The satin stitch is worked over this split stitch line, so you don't actually see the split stitch after the satin stitch is finished.

But I think what you're asking about is outlining around a satin stitched area, on the outside of the satin stitching, after the satin stitch is finished. Of course you can do this, if you want. In fact, if the edges of your satin stitch are a bit jagged or uneven, it's a good way to cover that up. But the stem stitch outline around the outside of the satin stitch will add another level of "texture" on the outside of the stitch - and it will make the element a little "fatter" if you've satin stitched to your design edge already. So it just depends on the look you want, really!

Whether or not you do that stem stitch outline before or after is up to you. The advantage of doing it first is that you can restrict the stem stitch outline to the design line, and remain true to your proportions (and then fill inside that outline with your satin stitch). Also, you won't accidentally displace or mess up your satin stitch while stem stitching. So, two advantages there. On the other hand, it'll be more difficult to get a really nice satin stitch that stretches all the way to the stem stitch, and lays very nicely, because your stem stitch will be in the way.

I'd suggest practicing it both ways first, and see how you like doing it. Then you'll know!

OH, and if you're outlining the outside of the satin stitch with stem stitch, I don't necessarily see a need for the split stitch outline underneath the satin stitch, unless you want to "lift" the satin stitch edges a bit. But if that doesn't matter, and if you're definitely going to do the stem stitch on the outside of the satin stitch, I probably wouldn't bother with the split stitch outline first.

MC
MaryCorbet
Joined: 6/1/2011 9:45 am
Posts: 437
Location: Kansas
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Re: Outline stitching

Thank you, Mary! That is pretty much what I was thinking, either/or but not both. The leaves I did looked nice enough and I didn't see a need to outline them again. I'm new to all this, and learning every day. I'm so glad I found this place! I cannot begin to tell you what a wonderful resource this is for me. I'm continuing to learn, one stitch at a time, and it is so comforting to know that I can come here with my questions.
Mollysatin
Joined: 9/9/2011 2:32 pm
Posts: 4

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