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Mary Corbet

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I learned to embroider when I was a kid, when everyone was really into cross stitch (remember the '80s?). Eventually, I migrated to surface embroidery, teaching myself with whatever I could get my hands on...read more

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Recycled Silk for Embroidery?

 

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Have you ever tried recycled silk for embroidery? I haven’t – not yet, that is! Recycled silk is interesting stuff, and I think it would look neat couched on a piece of embroidery.

First of all, what is it? There are a lot of websites out there that are devoted to recycled silk and recycled silk products. Basically, the “leftovers” from the silk mills where fabrics are made (to use for saris, which come in a range of colors and patterns), which are taken and spun into a multi-colored yarn. The yarn is irregular, colorful, a little hairy, and sometimes rather “slubby,” but it’s the color and texture that makes it interesting and pretty stuff.

Recycled silk is used primarily for knitting and crocheting. But why can’t it be used for embroidery, too? I doubt this question is original – I imagine there are heaps of needleworkers out there who have done just that. I think, to maintain its look, the yarn would have to be couched. Perhaps others use it differently, though. On the right sized mesh, it would probably work in needlepooint.

You can get recycled silk through many sources online, but the one that caught my eye was the Wool Peddler. I think it caught my eye, firstly, because of the name. It didn’t match what I was looking for! Secondly, I like the logo on the site. Thirdly, they promise quality yarn, and they deliver quality yarn…. and, fourthly…

Visit the Wool Peddler and read about recycled silk

I like their pictures of the yarn!

So I’ve added recycled silk to my list of things to do, and one of these days, I’m going to give it a try. If you’ve worked with it, feel free to leave a comment and tell others what you like or don’t like about it, or to share resources.

 
 

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